The challenge of measuring childhood adversity

Comment

The challenge of measuring childhood adversity

What do we really mean when we talk about childhood adversity?  How can we best measure it? In the latest Said&Dunn post, Research Coordinator Katie Davis makes a push for precision in how we define, capture, and refine adverse childhood experiences in research.

By: Katie Davis

Comment

Why screen for postpartum depression?

Comment

Why screen for postpartum depression?

Postpartum depression is common and has long-term consequences for both moms and their babies. Check out the latest Said&Dunn post written by Karmel Choi, who shares ways to spot depression in new moms, and summarizes why such efforts are so important.

By: Karmel Choi

Comment

When policymakers don’t listen to science, children suffer

Comment

When policymakers don’t listen to science, children suffer

Like many Americans, we have been horrified by recent reports of children being separated from their parents at U.S. border facilities. What's happening at the border clearly goes against decades of research on the damaging effects of toxic stress during childhood. We strongly feel that a change in policy is needed.

By: Erin Dunn

Comment

Can we talk about causality?

Comment

Can we talk about causality?

Causal language irritates, perplexes, and sometimes inspires the scientific community - but it is a tricky thing to navigate, especially when communicating with people who don't have a scientific background. This week's Said&Dunn piece, written by our data analyst, Yiwen, explores the use of causal language in psychosocial research.

By: Yiwen Zhu

Comment

Graduate Student Mental Health

Comment

Graduate Student Mental Health

Graduate school can be stressful. It is therefore no surprise that graduate students, particularly those in helping professions or who conduct research related to health, report feeling high levels of stress and experience high rates of mental illness.

By: Kristen Nishimi

Comment

How about boys?

Comment

How about boys?

During any given year, an estimated 13-20% of US children experience some type of mental disorder –– and these numbers have been on the rise.  Although media attention often focuses on mental health problems in girls, recent data in the US suggests that school-aged boys are more likely than their female peers to have any type of mental, behavioral, or developmental disorder.

By: Kathryn Davis and Sam Ernst

Comment

Research Replication Revolution

Comment

Research Replication Revolution

Scientists in psychology and many other disciplines have started a “replication revolution" designed to increase confidence in scientific findings. What do we think about the replication movement? Read more here.

By: Sam Ernst, Meg Wang, and Erin Dunn

Comment

Comment

What is depression and how can it be treated?

Depression is one of the most common, costly, and disabling mental disorders worldwide; however, there are many different types of treatment available for people struggling with depression. Read more about treatment options and find helpful links to resources in this article.

By: Sam Ernst and Karmel Choi

Comment

How does stress affect the brain?

Comment

How does stress affect the brain?

Youth are particularly vulnerable to the effects of stress. Childhood stress, and particularly exposure to its most severe and chronic forms, including things like abuse, or poverty, is known to associate with poor physical and mental health, not only during childhood and adolescence but also even into adulthood.

By: Sam Ernst

Comment