shutterstock_156241253.jpg
shutterstock_201441734.jpg
Group.jpg
shutterstock_148577825.jpg
shutterstock_100350308.jpg
shutterstock_156241253.jpg

Identifying strategies to prevent depression and anxiety across the lifespan


SCROLL DOWN

Identifying strategies to prevent depression and anxiety across the lifespan


In the Dunn Lab, we use the tools of developmental and translational epidemiology to identify strategies for reducing the burden of mental illness throughout the lifespan.

Our research seeks to understand the mechanisms that influence risk for mental illness across the lifespan, with a special emphasis on depression and anxiety among women, children, adolescents, and other vulnerable populations (e.g. racial/ethnic minorities; individuals of low socioeconomic status). 

Our long-term goal is to translate discoveries about causal mechanisms into effective preventive strategies that reduce the onset of mood disorders and eliminate disparities. 

Our primary focus is on the role of early environmental exposures, especially childhood adversity, and the social contexts where youth spend the majority of their time outside of the family (e.g., schools, neighborhoods).  

Recognizing that interdisciplinary approaches can lead to breakthrough discoveries, we bring a multilevel or "genes to society" perspective to our work, including by studying gene-environment interplay (GxE).

Our work has been supported by the National Institute of Mental Health, the Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University, the Brain & Behavior Research Foundation, and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

shutterstock_201441734.jpg

Current Studies


Current Studies


Current work in our group focuses on two primary areas.  

The first seeks to identify sensitive periods, or the “high-risk/high-reward” stages of human development when deleterious exposures are most harmful and when enriching exposures and interventions can offer greatest benefit.  We use data from large-scale epidemiological surveys to identify these periods of heightened plasticity.  Ongoing research is studying sensitive periods corresponding to domains of cognitive (e.g., memory, attention, and other aspects of executive functioning) and social-emotional development (e.g., emotion recognition skills; social cognition).  We are also examining the extent to which timing of exposure to childhood adversity and variation in sensitive period-relevant genes predicts these “intermediate domains” and subsequent depressive and anxiety symptoms.  With collaborators in neurology, recent extensions of our work on sensitive periods have been centered on examining predictors of incident depression in the period following a stroke event.

The second area of our research focuses on disentangling the role of schools and neighborhoods on adolescent risk for mood disorders and related health concerns.  With our close collaborator Tracy Richmond at Boston Children’s Hospital, we have been applying novel statistical methods, including cross-classified multilevel modeling, to study the unique contribution of each context after controlling for the other.  The main questions that drive our work are:  
•    How different are schools from neighborhoods in the risks and protections they confer?  
•    Are schools or neighborhoods more salient for certain types of youth?  
•    What are the mental health outcomes of youth embedded in disparate settings (i.e. youth who learn in a “healthy” school, but live in an “unhealthy” neighborhood)?  

Currently, our emphasis is on testing these questions using large epidemiological samples and conducting a qualitative study to develop a working theoretical model to describe the unique role of schools and neighborhoods on adolescents.

Group.jpg

Our team


Our team


We are a multidisciplinary team of researchers from a range of fields, including epidemiology, public health, genetics, education, neurology, psychiatry, and psychology.


PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR


Erin C. Dunn is a social and psychiatric epidemiologist with expertise in genetics.  She is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School and the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). She also holds an appointment in the Stanley Center for Psychiatric Research at the Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT.  Dr. Dunn’s research is centered on using cross-disciplinary approaches to better understand the social and genetic factors that influence the etiology of mental health problems.  She focuses mainly on depression and anxiety among women, children, adolescents and other vulnerable populations (i.e., racial/ethnic minorities; individuals of low socioeconomic status).  The long-term goal of her work is to identify the causal mechanisms underlying risk for depression, develop population-based strategies for prevention, and target these strategies to periods in development when they could have greatest impact.  Dr. Dunn received a Doctor of Science in 2011 from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.  She trained under Drs. Karestan Koenen, Subu Subramanian, Felton Earls, and Katherine Masyn. Dr. Dunn also completed post-doctoral research training at MGH under Drs. Jordan Smoller and Jonathan Rosand.  Dr. Dunn’s work has been funded by the National Institute of Mental Health, the Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University, the Brain & Behavior Research Foundation, and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. 

Erin.jpg

POST-GRADUATES


I was born and grew-up in Pistoia, Italy, where I’ve done most of my studies, including high school, where my strong interest in science began. Following my university studies, I graduated from medical school cum laude with a thesis on the genetics of memory at the University of Florence in 2009. I started the neurology residency right after at the same University, graduating cum laude last year. I was trained in the stroke Unit and I was responsible for clinical assessment, neuroimaging and neuropsychological evaluation in a study on the risk factors of cognitive disorders in the elderly. More recently, I spent one semester at the University of Genève, Switzerland, where I dedicated myself to advanced computational neuroimaging, studying functional and structural connectivity measures in vascular cognitive impairment. Finally, I spent six months in Albuquerque (NM) where I had the opportunity to become more familiar with molecular mechanisms of the white matter injuries, commonly seen in elderly patients. Cerebrovascular disease, genetics and aging brain are definitely my main interests that I would like to explore from different point of view.

Karmel Choi

IMG_Karmel.jpg

Karmel Choi, Ph.D., is a postdoctoral fellow in the Psychiatric & Neurodevelopmental Genetics Unit at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and a postdoctoral collaborator with the Dunn Lab. She is mentored by Drs. Jordan Smoller and Karestan Koenen through the T32 Training Fellowship in Psychiatric Genetics at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Her research focuses on the interplay of genetic and environmental factors that influence trauma and resilience across the life course, leveraging methods from statistical genetics, network science, and developmental epidemiology. Her clinical work focuses on treatment of mood and anxiety disorders and stress-related health conditions, particularly among women. Karmel completed her PhD in Clinical Psychology at Duke University and her predoctoral clinical internship in Behavioral Medicine at MGH. 


GRADUATE STUDENTS


Kristen Nishimi

Kristen graduated from UC Berkeley in 2012 with a B.A. in Psychology and completed a M.P.H. in 2016 at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health in Social and Behavioral Science. She is currently pursuing a Ph.D. in Population Health Science at Harvard University. Her research examines the impact of early life adversity and trauma on mental and physical health outcomes, focusing on understanding the processes of psychological resilience. In the Dunn Lab, her work focuses on identifying sensitive periods to early adversity on psychological outcomes later in development or in adulthood. 

 

Meg Min-Jung Wang

Meg graduated from the University of Pennsylvania in 2011 with a B.A. in the Biological Basis of Behavior, and received a M.Sc. in Epidemiology from Imperial College London in 2012. She is currently a doctoral student in Epidemiology at the Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health. Her prior work includes research on the genetics of nicotine addiction and social risk factors on workplace mental health, which prompted her interest in both genetic and environmental risk factors and how their interplay leads to psychopathology. Meg is now using data from the Nurses’ Health Study II to determine how childhood adversity and the developmental timing of the exposure moderates the impact of genetic risk variants on mental disorders.

 

 

 
meg.jpg

UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS


Sam Ernst

Sam is currently in her fourth year of an undergraduate program in Behavioral Neuroscience at Northeastern University. She is completing a six-month co-op experience here at the Dunn lab. Previously, she worked as a co-op/research assistant with the Harvey Lab at Harvard Medical School and with the Suicide and Mental Health Research Group at the University of Otago, Wellington. Sam is interested in exploring the role of neuroplasticity and genetics as factors underlying mental illnesses such as depression. In the lab, she is hoping to gain a better understanding of the extent to which early life stress and biological factors predict mental health outcomes.

 

RESEARCH ASSISTANTS


Katherine is a Clinical Research Coordinator for the Center for Genomic Medicine at the Massachusetts General Hospital. Katherine graduated with a B.S. in Biology with a concentration in Genetics, Genomics, and Development from Cornell University in 2015. While at school Katherine developed a keen interest in working with large scale genomic data as well as a budding curiosity for neurological diseases. Her previous research experience includes work with Equine Genetics as well as RNA editing in Arabidopsis. Katherine is assisting in analysis of data from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC). 

 

Katie Davis

Katie graduated from Brown University in 2012 with a B.A. in Gender & Sexuality Studies, and received an M.A. in Psychology from Brandeis University in 2017.  Her research at Brandeis focused on the developmental sequelae of childhood abuse in a sample of male juveniles who had sexually offended.  As a Clinical Research Coordinator at the Dunn Lab, Katie hopes to continue to explore the extent to which early life adversity and genetic variation predict subsequent psychopathology.

KDAVIS Headshot copy.jpg

DATA ANALYSTS


Yiwen graduated from Smith College in 2016 with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Psychology and Statistical & Data Sciences. She also received a Master of Science degree in Biostatistics from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health in 2017. Her past research experience includes applying integrative approaches for causal mediation analyses as well as examining latent trauma subtypes on the population level. Joining the Dunn Lab as a data analyst, Yiwen is excited to apply her statistical skills and explore the underlying biological mechanisms (especially epigenetic changes) that connect early life adversity to psychopathology.

Yiwen-headshot-final.JPG

Khalil Zlaoui

Khalil received a Master's degree in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from ENSAE ParisTech (the Paris Institute of Technology). He is currently a graduate student in Biostatistics at Brown University. Before joining the Dunn lab, he interned at the World Bank Group in Washington D.C. working as a data analyst, and also worked at HSBC in Paris. Additionally, he also interned at the French Research institute for Exploitation of the Sea (IFREMER) where he ran data analyses to help protect New Caledonia’s fragile ecosystems. Joining the Dunn Lab as a data analyst, he will be focusing on the genomic predictors of susceptibility to depression, and how exposure to stress during periods in development becomes biologically embedded. Khalil’s research interests include environmental statistics, genetics, cancer genomics, and the application of machine learning algorithms. Outside of the lab, he enjoys all types of sports and traveling to warm places. 


INTERNS


Juan C. Ramirez-Tapia

Juan is from Peru and he recently joined the Dunn Lab as a bioinformatics intern. He will be supporting in data analysis while exploring gene-based associated methods for evaluating genetic effects related to sensitive periods. In the past, he worked at MGH and Boston University School of Medicine where he helped to implement a local database and evaluated RNA extraction methods for NGS analysis, respectively. He also worked at the Massachusetts Department of Public Health–BSAS where he participated in the efforts of mapping treatment providers. Other activities that he likes to do consist of raising awareness of adaptive sports for people with physical disabilities. Juan received his B.S. in Biology at Stonehill College and his M.S. in Bioinformatics at Boston University.

JuanRamirez.jpg

ALUMNI


  David Steefel-Moore    Former Masters student at the Harvard Graduate School of Education

David Steefel-Moore

Former Masters student at the Harvard Graduate School of Education

  Jenna Kiely    Former Research Assistant at the Psychiatric and Neurodevelopmental Genetics Unit.    

Jenna Kiely

Former Research Assistant at the Psychiatric and Neurodevelopmental Genetics Unit. 

 

  Miriam Raffeld   Former Research Technician at the Center for Genomic Medicine

Miriam Raffeld

Former Research Technician at the Center for Genomic Medicine

  Stephanie Gomez   Former Research Assistant at the Psychiatric and Neurodevelopmental Genetics Unit

Stephanie Gomez

Former Research Assistant at the Psychiatric and Neurodevelopmental Genetics Unit

  Zheng Kuang   Former Masters student at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

Zheng Kuang

Former Masters student at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

  Yael Dai   Former Clinical Research Coordinator at the Psychiatric and Neurodevelopmental Genetics Unit

Yael Dai

Former Clinical Research Coordinator at the Psychiatric and Neurodevelopmental Genetics Unit

  Sandy Li   Former Research Assistant at the Psychiatric and   Neurodevelopmental Genetics Unit.  

Sandy Li

Former Research Assistant at the Psychiatric and   Neurodevelopmental Genetics Unit.  

  Yan Wang   Former Masters student at the Boston University School of Public Health

Yan Wang

Former Masters student at the Boston University School of Public Health

  Daniel Busso   Former Doctoral student at the Harvard Graduate School of Education.   

Daniel Busso

Former Doctoral student at the Harvard Graduate School of Education.

 

  Virginia Fisher   Former Data Analyst and PhD Candidate at Boston University

Virginia Fisher

Former Data Analyst and PhD Candidate at Boston University

  Tom Soare   Former Senior Data Analyst at the Center for Genomic Medicine

Tom Soare

Former Senior Data Analyst at the Center for Genomic Medicine

  Nancy Wang   Former Undergraduate Research Assistant at the Psychiatric and Neurodevelopmental Genetics Unit

Nancy Wang

Former Undergraduate Research Assistant at the Psychiatric and Neurodevelopmental Genetics Unit

  Emily Moya   Former Research Assistant at the Psychiatric and Neurodevelopmental Genetics Unit

Emily Moya

Former Research Assistant at the Psychiatric and Neurodevelopmental Genetics Unit

  Alice Renaud   Former Research Assistant at the Psychiatric and Neurodevelopmental Genetics Unit

Alice Renaud

Former Research Assistant at the Psychiatric and Neurodevelopmental Genetics Unit

  Jenny Tse   Former Masters student at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

Jenny Tse

Former Masters student at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

shutterstock_148577825.jpg

Publications


Publications


Accepted/In Press

Dunn, E.C., Crawford, K.M., Soare, T.W., Button, K.S., Raffeld, M.R., Smith, A.D.A.C., Penton- Voak, I.S., & Munafo, M.R. (e-pub). Exposure to childhood adversity and deficits in emotion recognition: Results from a large, population-based sample. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry. PMID: 29512866. 

Dunn, E.C., Soare, T.W., Raffeld, M.R., Busso, D.S., Crawford, Davis, K.A., K.M., Fisher, V.A., Slopen, N., Smith, A.D.A.C., Tiemeier, H., & Susser, E.S. (e-pub). What life course theoretical models best explain the relationship between exposure to childhood adversity and psychopathology symptoms: recency, accumulation, or sensitive periods? Psychological Medicine. PMID: 29478418.

Peyrot, W.J., Van der Auwera, A., Milaneschi, Y., Dolan, C.V., Madden, P.A.F., Sullivan, P.F., Strohmaier, J., Ripke, S., Rietschel, M., Nivard, M.G., Mullins, N., Montgomery, G.W., Henders, A.K., Heat, A.C., Fisher, H.L., Dunn, E.C., Byrne, E.M., Air, T.A., Major Depressive Disorder Working Group of the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium, Baune, B.T., Breen, G., Levinson, D.F., Lewis, C.M., Martin, N.G., Elliot, N., Boomsma, D.I., Grabe, H.J., Wray, N.R., Penninx, B.W. (e-pub). Does childhood trauma moderate polygenic risk for depression? A meta-analysis of 5,765 subjects from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium. Biological Psychiatry. PMID: 29129318 PMCID: PMC5862738. 

2018

Milliren, C.E., Evans, C.R., Richmond, T.K., & Dunn, E.C. (2018). Does an uneven sample size distribution across settings matter in cross-classified multilevel modeling? Results of a simulation study. Health & Place, 52. 121-126.

Dunn, E.C., Nishimi, K., Gomez, S.H., Lott, A.P., & Bradley, B. (2018). Developmental timing of trauma exposure and emotion dysregulation in adulthood: Are there sensitive periods when trauma is most harmful? Journal of Affective Disorders, 227. 869-877. PMID: 29254068. PMCID: PMC5805641.

Dunn, E.C., Sofer, T., Wang, M., Soare, T.S., Gallo, L.C., Gogarten, S.M., Kerr, K. F., Chen, C., Stein, M.B., Ursano, R.J., Guo, X., Jia, Y., Yao, J., Rotter, J.I., Argos, M., Cai, J., Perreira, K., Wassertheil-Smoller, S., & Smoller, J.W. (2018) Genome-wide association study (GWAS) of depressive symptoms in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL). Journal of Psychiatric Research, 99. 167-176. PMID: 29505938.

Vaughn-Coaxum, R., Wang, Y., Kiely, J., Weisz, J.R., & Dunn, E.C.  (2018).  Associations between trauma type, timing, and accumulation on current coping behaviors in adolescents: Results from a large, population-based sample.  Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 47(4): 842-858. PMCID: in progress PMID: 28555292.

Wassertheil-Smoller, S., Qi, Q., Tushar, D., Mitchell, B., Jackson, R., Liu, S., Park, K., Salinas, J., Dunn, E.C., Leira, E., Smoller, J. (2018). Polygenic risk for depression increases risk of ischemic stroke: from the Stroke Genetics Network (SiGN) study.  Stroke , 49(3): 543-548. PMID: 29438084.

Van der Auwera, S., Peyrot, W.J., Milaneshi, Y., Hertel, J., Baune, B.T., Breen, G., Byrne, E.M., Dunn, E.C., Fisher, H.L., Homuth, G., Levinson, D.F., Lewis, C.M., Martin, N., Millis, N., Mullins, N., Nauck, M., Pistis, G., Preisig, M., Rietschel, M., Ripke, S., Sullivan, P.F., Teumer, A., Volzke, H., Major Depressive Disorder Working Group of the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium, Boomsma, D.I., Wray, N.R., Penninx, B.W.J.H., & Grabe, H.J. (2018). Genome-wide gene-environment interaction in depression: A systematic evaluation of candidate genes. American Journal of Medical Genetics: Neuropsychiatric Genetics, 77(1). 40-49. PMID: 29159863 PMCID: PMC5726923.

2017

Dunn, E.C., Wang, Y., Tse, J., McLaughlin, K.A., Fitzmaurice, G., Gilman, S.E., & Susser, E.S. (2017). Sensitive periods for the effect of childhood interpersonal violence on psychiatric disorder onset among adolescents. British Journal of Psychiatry, 211(6): 365–372. PMID: 29097401. PMCID: PMC5709674.

Dunn, E.C., Sofer, T., Gallo, L.C., Gogarten, S.M., Kerr, K. F., Chen, C., Stein, M.B., Ursano, R.J., Guo, X., Jia, Y., Qi, Q., Rotter, J.I., Argos, M., Cai, J., Penedo, F.J., Perreira, K., WassertheilSmoller, S., & Smoller, J.W. (2017). Genome-wide association study (GWAS) of generalized anxiety symptoms in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL). American Journal of Medical Genetics Part B: Neuropsychiatric Genetics. PMCID: PMC5501086. PMID: 27159506

Dunn, E.C., Nishimi, K., Lott, A.P., & Bradley, B.  (2017). Is developmental timing of trauma exposure associated with depressive and post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms in adulthood?  Journal of Psychiatric Research.  84, 119-127. PMCID: PMC5479490. PMID: 27728852

Gomez, S.H., Tse, J., Wang, Y., Turner, B., Millner, A., Nock, M.K., & Dunn, E.C. (2017).  Are there sensitive periods when child maltreatment substantially elevates suicide risk? Results from a nationally-representative sample of adolescents.  Depression & Anxiety. PMCID: In Progress. PMID: 28544045

Salinas, J., Ray, R., Nassir, R., Kamakshi, L., Dording, C., Smoller, J.W., Wassertheil-Smoller, S., Rosand, J., & Dunn, E.C.  (2017).  Factors associated with new-onset depression following ischemic stroke: The Women’s Health Initiative.  Journal of the American Heart Association. PMCID: PMC5523739. PMID: 28151400

Milliren, C.E., Richmond, T.K., Evans, C.R., Dunn, E.C., & Johnson, R.M.  (2017).  Contextual effects of neighborhoods and schools on adolescent and young adult marijuana use in the United States.  Substance Abuse: Research and Treatment, 11, 1-10.  PMCID: PMC5462815. PMID: 28615949

Bigdeli, T., Ripke, S., Bacanu, S., Abdellaoui, A., Andlauer, T., Beekman, A., Berger, K., Blackwood, D., Breen, G., Buttenschøn, H., Byrne, E., Cichon, S., Clarke, T., Couvy-Duchesne, B., Craddock, N., de Geus, E., Degenhardt, F., Dunn, E.C., Edwards, A., Frank, J., Gill, M., Gordon, S., Grabe, H.J., Hayward, C., Heath, A., Henders, A., Herms, S., Hickie, I., Hoffmann, P., Homuth, G., Hottenga, J., Ising, M., Jansen, R., Kloiber, S., Knowles, J., Lang, M., Li, Q., Lucae, S., MacIntyre, D., Madden, P., Martin, N., Nyholt, D., Mors, O., Nauck, M., Montgomery, G., Müller-Myhsok, B., Nöthen, M., McIntosh, A., Medland, S., McGuffin, P., Mehta, D., Middeldorp, C., Milaneschi, Y., McGrath, P., Owen, M., Perlis, R., Pergadia, M., Rivera, M., Peyrot, W., Rice, J., Porteous, D., Potash, J., Rietschel, M., Schoevers, R., Shi, J., Schulze, T., Shyn, S., Smit, J., Smoller, J., Streit, F., Strohmaier, J., Teumer, A., Treutlein, J., Van der Auwera, S., Peterson, R., Webb, B., van Hemert, A., van Grootheest, G., Weissman, M., Witt, S., Willemsen, G., Boomsma, D., Lewis, C., Wray, N., Fanous, A., Flint, J., Sullivan, P., Kendler, K., Levinson, D., Forstner, A., Hamilton, S., Riley, B., Völzke, H., Wellmann, J., Penninx, B., Mott, R., Hardiman, O. Genetic effects influencing risk for major depressive disorder in China and Europe. (2017) Translational Psychiatry. PMCID: PMC5404611. PMID: 28350396

 

2016

Direk, N., Williams, S., Smith, J.A., Ripke, S., Amin, N., Bennett, D.A., Blackwood, D.H.R., Boomsma, D., Breen, G., Buttenschøn, H.N., Bryne, E.M., Børglum, A.D., Castelao, E., Cichon, S., Clarke, T., Cornelis, M.C., De Jager, P.L., Demirkan, A., van Duijin, C.M., Dunn, E.C., Eriksson, J.G., Faul, J.D., Ferrucci, L., Fornage, M., de Geus, E., Gill, M., Gordon, S.D., Jörgen Grabe, H., van Grootheest, G., Hamilton, S.P., Heath, A.C., Hek, K., Hofman, A., Homuth, G., Jan Hottenga, J., Kardia, S.L.R., Kloiber, S., Koenen, K., Kutalik, Z., Ladwig, K.L., Lahti, J., Lewis, C.M., Lewis, G., Llewellyn, D.J., Lucae, S., Lunetta, K.L., MacIntyre, D.J., Madden, P., Martin, N.G., McIntosh, A.M., Milaneschi, Y., Monthgomery, G.W., Mors, O., Mosley Jr., T.H., Murabito, J.M., Müller-Myhsok, B., Nöthen, M., Nyholt, D.R., Penninx, B., Pergadia, M.R., Preisig, M., Purcell, S.M., Räikkönen, K., Rice, J.P., Rietschel, M., Rivera, M., Schulze, T.G., Shyn, S., Smit, J., Smoller, J.M., Tanaka, T., Teumer, A., Uher, R., Van der Auwera, S., Ware, E.B., Weir, D.R., Willemsen, G., Yang, J., Zhao, W., Tiemeier, H., Sullivan, P.F. An analysis of two genome-wide association meta-analyses identifies a new locus for broad depression phenotype.  (2016). Biological Psychiatry. PMCID: PMC5462867. PMID: 28049566

Richmond, T.K., Dunn, E.C., Milliren, C.E., Evans, C.R., & Subramanian, S.V.  (2016.) Disentangling overlapping influences of neighborhoods and schools on adolescent body mass index.  Obesity. PMCID: PMC5479485. PMID: 27863090

Dunn E.C., Wiste A., Radmanesh F., Almli L.M., Gogarten S.M., Sofer T., Faul J.D., Kardia S.L.R., Smith, J.A., Weir D.R., Zhao W., Mirza S.S., Hek K., Tiemier H.W., Goveas J.S., Sarto G.E., Snively B.M., Cornelis M., Koenen K.C., Kraft P., Purcell S., Kessler K.J., Rosand J., Wassertheil-Smoller S., & Smoller J.W. (2016) Genome-wide association study (GWAS) and genome-wide environment interaction study (GWEIS) of depressive symptoms in African American and Hispanic women. Depression and Anxiety, 33(4), 265-280. Supplemental Materials. PMCID: PMC4826276. PMID: 27038408

Dunn, E.C., Busso, D.S., Raffeld, M.R., Smoller, J.W., Nelson, C.A., Doyle, A.E., & Luk, G. (2016) Does developmental timing of exposure to child maltreatment predict memory performance in adulthood? Results from a large, population-based sample. Child Abuse and Neglect, 51, 181-191. PMCID: PMC4713298. PMID: 26585216

Wang, Y., Raffeld, M.R., Slopen, N., Hale, L., & Dunn, E.C. (2016). Childhood adversity and insomnia in adolescence. Sleep Medicine, 21(2016), 12-18. PMCID: PMC4964593. PMID: 27103664

Salinas, J., Ray, R.M., Nassir, R., Lakshminaraya, K., Dording, C., Smoller, J.W., WassertheilSmoller, S., Rosand, J., Dunn, E.C. (in press). Factors associated with new-onset depression after stroke. Journal of Neuropsychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences. PMCID: PMC5474200. PMID: 27056020

Pabayo, R., Dunn, E.C., Gilman, S.E., Kawachi, I., Molnar, B.E. (in press). Income inequality within urban settings and depressive symptoms among adolescents. Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health. PMCID: PMC5473150. PMID: 27103664

Carliner, H., Keyes, K.M., McLaughlin, K.A., Meyers, J.L., Dunn, E.C., & Martins, S.S.  (in press).  Childhood trauma and illicit drug use in adolescence: A population-based National Comorbidity Survey Replication-Adolescent Supplement Study.  Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. PMCID: PMC4964281. PMID: 27453084

2015

Dunn, E.C., Masyn, K.E., Jones, S.M., Subramanian, S.V., & Koenen, K.C.  (2015).  Measuring psychosocial climates using individual responses: An application of multilevel factor analysis to examining students in schools.  Prevention Science. PMCID: PMC4444407. PMID: 25421872.

Dunn, E.C., Masyn, K.E., Johnston, W.R., & Subramanian, S.V. (2015). Modeling contextual effects using individual-level data and without aggregation: An illustration of multilevel factor analysis (MLFA) with collective efficacy. Population Health Metrics. PMCID: PMC4445268. PMID: 26019691.

Dunn, E.C., Brown, R.C., Dai, Y., Rosand, J., Nugent, N.R., Amstadter, A.B., & Smoller, J.W.  (2015).  Genetic determinants of depression: Recent findings and future directions.  Harvard Review of Psychiatry, 23 (1), 1-18. PMCID: PMC4309382. PMID: 25563565.
 
Dunn, E.C., Milliren, C.E., Evans, C.R., Subramanian, S.V., & Richmond, T.K.  (2015).  Disentangling the relative influence of schools and neighborhoods on adolescents' risk for depressive symptoms.  American Journal of Public Health, 105 (4), 732-40. PMCID: PMC4358201. PMID: 25713969.

Dunn, E.C., Richmond, T.K., Milliren, C.E., & Subramanian, S.V. (2015). Using cross-classified multilevel models to disentangle school and neighborhood effects: An example focusing on smoking behaviors among adolescents in the United States. Health & Place, 31, 224-232. PMCID: PMC4443928. PMID: 25579227.
 
Gilman, S.E., Ni, M.Y., Dunn, E.C., Breslau, J., McLaughlin, K.A., Smoller, J.W., & Perlis, R.  (2015).  Contributions of the social environment to first-onset and recurrent maniaMolecular Psychiatry, 20, 329-336. PMCID: PMC4206672. PMID: 24751965.
 
Murphy, J.M., Guzman, J., McCarthy, A., Squicciarini, A.M., George, M., Canenguez, K., Dunn, E.C., Baer, L., Simonsohn, A., Smoller, J.W., & Jellinek, M.  (2015). Mental health predicts better academic outcomes: A longitudinal study of elementary school students in Chile.  Child Psychiatry and Human Development, 46 (2), 245-256. PMCID: PMC4443903. PMID: 24771270.

Germine, L., Dunn, E.C., McLaughlin, K.A., & Smoller, J.W. (2015). Childhood adversity is associated with adult theory of mind and social affiliation, but not face processing. Plos One. PMCID: PMC4466913. PMID: 26068107

2014

Dunn, E.C., Masyn, K.E., Yudron, M., Jones, S.M., & Subramanian, S.V. (2014). Translating multilevel theory into multilevel research: Challenges and opportunities for understanding the social determinants of psychiatric disorders. Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, 49, 859–872. PMCID: PMC4067412. PMID: 24469555.

Dunn, E.C., Solovieff, N., Lowe, S. R., Gallagher, P. J., Chaponis, J., Rosand, J., Koenen, K.C., Waters, M., Rhodes, J., & Smoller, J. W. (2014). Interaction between genetic variants and exposure to Hurricane Katrina on post-traumatic stress and post-traumatic growth: A prospective analysis of low income adults. Journal of Affective Disorders, 152-154, 243-249. PMCID: PMC3873605. PMID: 24161451.

Pearson-Fuhrhop, K.M., Dunn, E.C., Mortero, S., Devan, W.J., Falcone, G.J., Holmes, A.J., Hollinshead, M.O., Roffman, J.L., Smoller, J.W., Rosand, J., & Cramer, S.C. (2014). Dopamine gene score predicts depressive symptoms in healthy adults and adults with depression. Plos One, 9 (5), e93772. PMCID: PMC4023941. PMID: 24834916.

Dunn, E.C., Winning, A., & Subramanian, S.V. (2014). Does poor health predict moving, move quality, and desire to move?: A study examining neighborhood selection in US adolescents and adults. Health & Place, 30, 154-164. PMCID: PMC4467831. PMID: 25282124.

Green, J.G., Johnson, R.M., Dunn, E.C., Lindsey, M.A., Xuan, Z., & Zaslavsky, A.M. (2014). Mental health service use among high school students exposed to interpersonal violence. Journal of School Health, 84 (2), 141-149. PMCID: PMC4126199. PMID: 25099429.

2013

Dunn, E.C., McLaughlin, K.A., Slopen, N., Rosand, J., & Smoller, J.W. (2013). Developmental timing of child maltreatment and symptoms of depression and suicidal ideation in young adulthood: Results from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. Depression and Anxiety, 30, 955-964. PMCID: PMC3873604. PMID: 23592532.

Slopen, N., McLaughlin, K.A., Dunn, E.C., & Koenen, K.C. (2013). Childhood adversity and cell-mediated immunity in young adulthood: Does type and timing matter? Brain, Behavior, and Immunity, 28, 63-71. PMCID: PMC4180230. PMID: 23108062.

Duncan, D.T., Piras, G., Dunn, E.C., Johnson, R.M., Melly, S.J., & Molnar, B.E. (2013). The built environment and depressive symptoms among urban youth: A spatial regression study. Spatial and Spatio-Temporal Epidemiology, 5, 11-25. PMCID: PMC3734378. PMID: 23725884

Theall, K.P., Brett, Z.H., Shirtcliff, E.A., Dunn, E.C., & Drury, S.S. (2013). Neighborhood disorder and telomeres: Connecting children’s exposure to community level stress and cellular response. Social Science and Medicine, 85, 50-58. PMCID: PMC3615150. PMID: 23540366

2012

Dunn, E.C., Gilman, S., Slopen, N.B., Willett, J.B. & Molnar, B.E. (2012). The impact of exposure to interpersonal violence on gender differences in adolescent-onset major depression. Depression and Anxiety, 29, 392-399. PMCID: PMC4136968. PMID: 22447513.

Dunn, E.C., Johnson, R.M, & Green, J. G. (2012). The modified depression scale (MDS): A brief, no-cost tool to estimate the level of depressive symptoms in students and schools. School Mental Health, 4 (1), 34-45. PMCID: PMC3359067. PMID: 22639697

Tendulkar, S.A, Koenen, K.C., Dunn, E.C., Buka, S., & Subramanian, S.V. (2012). Neighborhood influences on perceived social support among parents: Findings from the Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods. Plos One, 9 (4), e34235. PMCID: PMC3320905. PMID: 22493683

2011

Dunn, E.C., Uddin, M., Subramanian, S.V., Smoller, J.W., Galea, S., & Koenen, K.C. (2011). Gene environment (GxE) interaction research in youth depression: A systematic review with recommendations for future research. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 52 (12), 1223-1238. PMCID: PMC3202044. PMID: 21954964

Johnson, R.M., Kidd, J.D., Dunn, E.C., Green, J.G., Corliss, H.L, & Bowen, D. (2011). Associations between caregiver support, bully victimization, and depressive symptomatology among sexual minority and heterosexual girls: Results from the 2008 Boston Youth Survey. Journal of School Violence, 10 (2), 185-200. PMCID: PMC3375119. PMID: 22707917

Green, J.G., Dunn, E.C., Johnson, R.M., & Molnar, B.E. (2011). A multi-level investigation of the association between school context and adolescent non-physical bully victimization. Journal of School Violence, 10 (2), 133-149. PMCID: PMC3083921. PMID: 21532943

2010

Dunn, E.C., Wewiorski, N.J., & Rogers, E.S. (2010). A qualitative investigation of individual and contextual factors associated with vocational recovery among people with serious mental illness. American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, 80 (2), 185-194. PMID: 20553512 

McLaughlin, K.A., Kubzansky, L., Dunn, E.C., Waldinger, R., Vaillant, G., & Koenen, K.C. (2010). Developmental origins of emotional reactivity to stress and life course associations with mood and anxiety disorders. Depression and Anxiety, 27, 1087-1094. PMID: 21132844

Tendulkar, S.A, Buka, S., Dunn, E.C., Subramanian, S.V., & Koenen, K.C. (2010). A multi-level investigation of neighborhood effects on parental warmth. Journal of Community Psychology, 38 (5), 557-573.

2009 and before

Azrael, D., Johnson, R.M., Molnar, B.E., Vriniotis, M., Dunn, E.C., Duncan, D.T., & Hemenway, D. (2009). Creating a youth violence data system for Boston, Massachusetts. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Criminology, 42 (3), 406-421. 

McCorkle, B.M., Dunn, E.C., Wan, Y.M., & Gagne, C. (2009). Compeer Friends: A qualitative study of a volunteer friendship programme for people with serious mental illness. International Journal of Social Psychiatry, 55 (4), 291-305. PMID: 19553360 

McCorkle, B.M., Rogers, E.S., Dunn, E.C., Wan, Y.M., & Lyass, A. (2008). Increasing social support for individuals with serious mental illness: Evaluating the Compeer model of intentional friendship.  Community Mental Health Journal, 44 (5), 359–366. PMID: 18481176

Dunn, E.C., Rogers, E.S., Hutchinson, D.S., Lyass, A., MacDonald Wilson, K.L., Wallace, L.R., & Furlong-Norman, K. (2008). Results of an innovative university-based recovery education program for adults with psychiatric disabilities. Administration and Policy in Mental Health and Mental Health Services Research, 35 (5), 357-369. PMID: 18553131

Dunn, E.C., Wewiorski, N.J., & Rogers, E.S. (2008). The meaning and importance of employment to people in recovery from serious mental illness: Results of a qualitative study. Psychiatric Rehabilitation Journal, 32 (1), 59-62. PMID: 18614451

Ellison, M.L., & Dunn, E.C. (2006). Empowering and demedicalized case management practices: Perspectives of mental health consumer leaders and professionals. Journal of Social Work in Disability and Rehabilitation, 5 (2), 1-17.

Hutchinson, D.S., Anthony, W.A, Ashcroft, L., Johnson, E., Dunn, E.C., Lyass, A, & Rogers, E.S. (2006). The personal and vocational impact of training and employing people with psychiatric disabilities as providers. Psychiatric Rehabilitation Journal 29, (3) 205-213. PMID: 16450932

Webster, D., & Dunn, E.C. (2005). Feminist perspectives on trauma. Women and Therapy, 28 (3/4), 111-142.

shutterstock_100350308.jpg

Inquiries


Inquiries


Available Positions

Master’s or Doctoral-Level Part-Time Data Analyst For Genetic Studies

The Dunn Lab is seeking a highly motivated and enthusiastic master’s or doctoral-level part-time data analyst to start immediately.  Working under the direction of Dr. Erin C. Dunn, the data analyst will be responsible for conducting data management and data analysis tasks for a study examining the genomic, transcriptomic, and epigenomic predictors of susceptibility to depression.  Ideal candidates would have an interest in genetics, as well as experience in genetic association analyses, R, the Unix environment, and working with large-scale epidemiological datasets.  Experience in psychiatric epidemiology is a plus, but not required.  The position will begin immediately and could be extended based on interest.  Opportunities for co-authorship of papers are available.  To apply, send a CV/resume and brief email introduction, indicating skills, training, and software packages used, to: Katie Davis, Clinical Research Coordinator II, Psychiatric and Neurodevelopmental Genetics Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital: kadavis@mgh.harvard.edu

 

Master’s or Doctoral-Level Part-Time Data Analyst for Study on the Biological Embedding of Poverty

The Dunn Lab is seeking a highly motivated and enthusiastic master’s or doctoral-level part-time data analyst to start immediately.  Working under the direction of Dr. Erin C. Dunn, the data analyst will be responsible for conducting data management and data analysis tasks for a study exploring the epigenetic pathways through which exposure to poverty becomes biologically embedded during sensitive periods in development.  Candidates should have an interest in poverty, socioeconomic status, social adversity, or social epidemiology.  Ideal applicants would have training in statistics or biostatistics and experience with R or SAS.  Experience working with large-scale epidemiological datasets is a plus, but not required.  The position will begin immediately and could be extended based on interest.  Opportunities for co-authorship of papers are available.  To apply, send a CV/resume and brief email introduction, indicating skills, training, and software packages used, to: Katie Davis, Clinical Research Coordinator II, Psychiatric and Neurodevelopmental Genetics Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital:kadavis@mgh.harvard.edu

 

Other

We are always open to inquiries from individuals wishing to join the lab. In general, we are looking for people who have strong statistical skills and capacity to work with large epidemiological datasets. We are also open to working with those who have a good quantitative background, are highly motivated, and able to quickly learn new statistical techniques. Most importantly, we are looking for team players who are curious, interested in interdisciplinary approaches, and deeply passionate about finding ways to prevent mental illness. 

To apply, email your CV and a brief letter of interest to Dr. Dunn